O Yes - What is a Vaginal Orgasm?

People with vaginas may worry that if they aren’t having vaginal orgasms, they aren’t having the right kind of orgasms. The idea of orgasming alongside a penetrating partner is alluring and frequently portrayed in steamier shows and movies. However, it doesn’t always work out this way, and the anatomy behind vaginal orgasms is a bit more complicated than the media would have you believe.

There’s a whole lot more under the surface of vaginal orgasms than most of us realize, so let’s take a peek behind the curtain.

What Is a Vaginal Orgasm?

how to have a vaginal orgasm

First, vaginal orgasm can generally be defined as an orgasm that occurs during vaginal penetration. However, the “purely vaginal” orgasm or an orgasm that occurs with only vaginal penetration may not be as common as the media would make it out to be. 

A meta-analysis of 33 studies shows that only about 25% of cis-women can reliably orgasm from vaginal intercourse alone. Most vaginas need at least a little attention paid to their clitoris to climax.

‌In addition, most people with vaginas need direct stimulation before penetration even happens. Stimulation of the nipples or clitoris — or just arousal in general — helps the vagina produce moisture, making penetration easier.

What’s Going on Down There?

Why can some individuals with a vagina consistently orgasm during intercourse while others cannot? It turns out that it has a lot to do with the anatomy of the clitoris.

The Clitoris Goes Deep

The clitoris is much larger than scientists initially realized, encasing the also-sensitive vestibular bulb tissue surrounding that vaginal wall. The clitoris is analogous in sensation and size to the penis. In a sense, the part of the clitoris you can see — the glans — is just the tip of the iceberg—a pretty exciting thought. 

It has led most scientists to believe that orgasms during intercourse happen because the internal part of the clitoris is stimulated. It means that strictly speaking, vaginal orgasms are still clitoral orgasms

‌However, which part of the clitoris is stimulated can lead to different sensations. What does a vaginal orgasm feel like? Many people who experience vaginal orgasms describe them as feeling “deeper,” and they’re more likely to trigger rhythmic spasms.

Soft Spots: Stimulating Your Vagina

G-Spot: Is It Real?

Recent scientific research suggests that the g-spot is not anatomically distinct, but is rather an erogenous zone in the vagina, when pressed, tends to stimulate the internal part of the clitoris. Some articles will tell you that this means the g-spot isn’t real. 

vagina orgasm gif

However, we find it more helpful to think about the g-spot as more of a section of the clitoris or an erogenous zone than a discrete entity. Many people report that stimulating the clitoris this way feels different from stimulating the external glans. 

Cervix

There are other erogenous zones in the vagina. For example, some people find stimulating their cervix — the bottom of the uterus, which protrudes into the vaginal canal — to be pleasurable. If you do go this route, however, you’ll want to be aware of where you are in your cycle, as the cervix tends to be more sensitive right before and during your period.

A-Spot (Anterior Fornix)

A lesser-known erogenous zone within the vaginal wall is the anterior fornix, or “a-spot.” Similar to the g-spot, it likely is a zone within the vaginal wall that, when pressed, tends to stimulate the clitoris. Since it is about two inches higher up than the g-spot, it is easy to confuse the two. Still, if the g-spot has never done it for you, it may be worth giving your a-spot a try.

CHROMA SLEEVE 2

chroma sleeve 2

Speaking of pressure, as part of the Chroma sleeve collection, JimmyJane introduced the Chroma Sleeve 2 with an ergonomic finger holder base. Not only can you take complete control of your pleasure, but JimmyJane added a slightly curved bulbous head perfect for g-spot stimulation, vaginal insertion, or anal insertion for individuals with a vulva or penis. What more could you ask for in a bullet sleeve.

Getting in Your Feels: How To Have a Vaginal Orgasm?

Under Pressure

Vaginal walls themselves don’t tend to have a ton of nerve endings, which makes sense when you think about it — who wants to feel even more of childbirth? However, the tissue surrounding the vaginal canal is susceptible, and to stimulate it, you’ll need pressure.

vagina orgasm gif

Vaginal orgasms are achieved when the tissue surrounding the vagina (the vestibular bulbs, which are analogous to the male head of the penis) engorges during arousal and pushes against the “legs” of the clitoris that surround it. You could think about this as a roundabout way to achieve an orgasm, but you could also think about how deep the pleasure has to go to achieve a purely vaginal orgasm.

‌Whereas direct clitoral stimulation feels best with small vibrations, vaginal stimulation is best with heavy pressure (within reason, of course). It is why sex toys designed to stimulate these two different areas often look so different. The needs are different, even if they ultimately target the same organ.

Which Kind of Orgasm Was That?

If your partner is stimulating your glans while penetrating you, it may be impossible to tell which good feeling triggered your orgasm or what type of orgasm it was. And honestly, at the moment, why worry about it? 

‌The distinction between vaginal and clitoral orgasms may not be necessary to you or your partner. Then again, if the orgasms feel different, then they are.

Orgasms Are Orgasms

Which Kind of Orgasm Was That

Many cis-women and trans women turn to flick the bean because it’s the most obvious way to masturbate; it feels good and isn’t messy. But if you haven’t experimented with stimulating your g-spot by yourself, it may be time to give it a try. It can help you identify the best positions to trigger a vaginal orgasm with your partner later.

‌For that matter, try having a nipple orgasm or an anal orgasm. Any erogenous zone on your body — which differs from person to person — can be the ticket to orgasm.

For an on-the-go orgasm, JimmyJane has brought back the favorite fan Chroma with an all-new aesthetic. A perfectly sleek on-the-go vibrator makes the Chroma a must-add to any collection. An oldy but goody, the Chroma was redesigned to incorporate five high-performing vibration modes and five intensity levels, becoming the most discreet and powerful bullet you can buy. 

Important Words To Remember

Before you embark on your latest sexual adventure, we wanted to leave a few words of affirmation for folks with vaginas to remember.

  • You do not have to “prove” to anyone that you orgasmed.
  • You do not have to have vaginal orgasms to enjoy intercourse.
  • It is OK to get more sexual satisfaction from fingers or toys than penises.

However you achieve pleasure, we wish you many happy Os.

Hopefully, once you have read this guide, you will understand how vaginal orgasms can be achieved and how JimmyJane’s Chroma plus the Chroma sleeves can help you achieve it.

References

The Most Important Sexual Statistic. (March 2009). Psychology Today.

Is There Such a Thing as a Vaginal Orgasm?. (November 2016) Psychology Today.

Is there really a vaginal orgasm?. (October 2014). ABC Health.‌

Is the Female G‐Spot Truly a Distinct Anatomic Entity?. (January 2012). The Journal of Sexual Medicine.‌

Everything You Need to Know About the A-Spot. (June 2019). Healthline.‌